Lincoln research showcased on BBC’s Ingenious Animalsbearded dragons

Research by Dr Anna Wilkinson from the University of Lincoln’s School of Life Sciences features on a prime-time BBC television series which sheds light on fascinating findings from the animal world.

Ingenious Animals is a new BBC One series in which a team of wildlife experts travel the globe in search of the most surprising animal stories and reveal how and why animals do such remarkable things.

Dr Wilkinson’s work exploring the cognitive abilities of cold-blooded animals featured in the opening episode of the series, which is presented by award-winning broadcaster Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall.

Her research has resulted in world-first evidence that reptiles can learn through imitation

Lincoln researcher talks mental health on BBC Look NorthKaren Windle

The need to support the mental health of older people has been highlighted by leading academic Dr Karen Windle as part of a week-long BBC news series about the topic.

Dr Windle, a Reader in the University of Lincoln’s School of Health and Social Care, says combatting loneliness will play a large role in improving the wellbeing of older people. In the report, Dr Windle explains how isolation and depression amongst the over 65s can have a huge impact on the physical health of older people.

Calling for more action, Dr Windle explained in the report that if someone is suffering from loneliness and social isolation, they are far more likely to be depressed and anxious, and they are far more likely to use residential and nursing care services at an earlier stage.

The full interview can be viewed here

Dr Rhonda R Snook talks at LincolnRhondaSnook

A lecture given by Dr Rhonda R Snook, a reader in the Department of Animal and Plant Sciences at the University of Sheffield (TUoS), was hosted by WiSE@Lincoln. The talk was attended by academics, researchers and professional and support staff involved in the University of Lincoln’s Athena SWAN/ECU Gender Charter activities.

Dr Snook is Chair of the Women@TUoS Network – a platform supporting the careers of women academics and researchers – and talked at length about the initiatives and actions the Network has engaged with for a Silver Athena SWAN Institutional award. She was keen to share some of their successes and good practices, as well as practical tips and recommendations on how to set up and maintain a vibrant, strategically relevant women’s network in academia.

Her Department’s recent submission for a Gold Athena SWAN Award also provided much food for thought for those at Lincoln planning their own future School actions.

Back 2 Science Fellowship poster wins Directors Prize5604 UoL Athena SWAN A0 poster PROOF3

The Back 2 Science Fellowships at the University of Lincoln have received national recognition by being awarded the Poster Exhibition Conference Directors Prize at the ARMA 25th Anniversay conference.

The ARMA is the UK’s professional association for research managers and administrators; facilitating excellence in research by identifying and establishing best practice in research management and administration. The poster, outlining the opportunities the Fellowship provides and the challenges it aims to address, can be viewed in full here: 5604 UoL Athena SWAN A0 poster PROOF3

The Back 2 Science Fellowships were launched as part of the University’s commitment to the Athena SWAN Charter, which supports women in science, technology, engineering, mathematics and medicine.

Lincoln supporting girl power in the sciences
Athena SWAN

The University of Lincoln, UK, is spearheading equality and opportunity for female academics, providing numerous funding schemes, inspirational lectures and mentoring programmes.

A new report details the University’s successes since signing up to the Athena SWAN charter, which encourages institutions to develop employment practices to advance the representation, plus further and support the careers of women in science, technology, engineering, mathematics and medicine (STEMM).

 

Researchers go Back to Science thanks to new Fellowships

BAck to science logoTwo researchers have been awarded science Fellowships from the University of Lincoln, worth up to £21,000. The University of Lincoln, UK, established the Back to Science Fellowships as part of its commitment to the Athena SWAN Charter, which supports women in science, technology, engineering, mathematics and medicine. Physicist Fiona Bissett and ecologist Dr Graziella Iossa have been selected to receive the first two awards and, as a result, they are now undertaking research projects alongside academic colleagues in Lincoln’s College of Science.

Great Minds: what maths can tell us about animal antics

Lisa%20CollinsAn expert in animal welfare will illustrate how mathematics can help us better understand the complex and sometimes bizarre behaviour of animals in a free public guest lecture as part of the University of Lincoln’s Great Minds series.

Dr Lisa Collins, from the University’s School of Life Sciences, will demonstrate how fractal analysis – typically used to describe the complexity in swirling galaxies, the ruggedness of a stretch of coastline and the structural detail of a snowflake – can be used to understand the feelings of everything from chickens to Chihuahuas, and even what it can tell us about ourselves.

Lincoln researcher on BBC World News

LucyEasthopeDr Lucy Easthope, an expert in mass fatality disasters, was interviewed on BBC World News about missing Malaysian plane MH370 and the impact its unknown whereabouts is having on friends and family of the passengers. Dr Easthope, from the School of Life Sciences, specialises in mass fatalities planning, Disaster Victim Identification (DVI), community recovery and the care of survivors, the bereaved and the deceased after a disaster.

 

 

University achieves Athena SWAN Bronze Award
AS_RGB_Bronze-AwardThe University of Lincoln has been recognised for its commitment to advancing women’s careers in STEMM academia by achieving its Bronze Award as part of the Athena SWAN Charter.With recent research showing that men in the UK are six times more likely than women to work in science-related careers, the University of Lincoln pledged to ‘create a level playing field for all’ and develop employment practices to advance the representation, plus further and support the careers of women in science, technology, engineering, mathematics and medicine (STEMM).
Professor Mary Stuart, Vice Chancellor of the University of Lincoln, said: “I am delighted that the University of Lincoln has been recognised for its commitment to combating the underrepresentation of women in these vital subjects, while providing the correct mechanisms to advance the careers of women in STEMM research and academia. We have begun an organisational and cultural transformation that makes a real difference for women and enables all staff to achieve their maximum potential.”

 

Get Back to Science with Fellowship scheme
BAck to science logoAcademics who have taken extended career breaks are being given the opportunity to apply for a Back to Science Fellowship at the University of Lincoln, UK.The aim of the Fellowships are to provide a sound platform for both men and women in Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics and Medicine (STEMM) subject areas to kick-start their careers. The one-year opportunity will enable Fellows to join an established research group, build confidence and gain contemporary research experience.

Girls on scientific voyage of discovery
The Newton Academy - the Science Club for Girls

A new academy aimed at encouraging young girls to pursue careers in science and technology has been launched in Lincoln.

The Newton Academy – the Science Club for Girls, set up by the University of Lincoln, UK, has recruited its first cohort of 10-11 year olds who will be taken through a three-year scheme involving 12 Saturday morning science and technology-themed workshops. The first event introduced the group to computer science and robotics, followed by a Spud Science Day covering a range of STEM topics from potato batteries to electronic noses. A Chemistry Christmas Cracker, is planned for 6th December.

Lincoln scientist to deliver Charles Darwin Award Lecture
British Science Festival

An expert in animal welfare will illustrate how mathematics can help us better understand the complex and sometimes bizarre behaviour of pets, livestock and wildlife after she was chosen to deliver one of Britain’s most prestigious public lectures.
Dr Lisa Collins, from the School of Life Sciences, University of Lincoln, UK, has been selected to present the Charles Darwin Award Lecture at the British Science Festival on Saturday, 6th September 2014. Dr Collins will present her lecture ‘What can maths tell us about how an animal is feeling?’.
New academics join team of computer scientists
Kathrin Gerling
Two specialists in human-computer interaction have joined the growing team at the University of Lincoln’s School of Computer Science. Dr John Shearer and Kathrin Gerling will be continuing their research into interactive technologies that have a purpose beyond entertainment.
Ms Gerling is particularly interested in how motion-based interfaces can be used by people with special needs and her award-winning research on wheelchair-based game input has been presented at top international venues. By modifying a Microsoft Kinect sensor, Ms Gerling demonstrated how gamers in a wheelchair could interact with motion games. The modification that she made to the Kinect meant that the system could take into account the position and movement of the wheelchair.
Lincoln graduate lands role with leading medical research institute
Dr Hettie Roebuck conducting her PhD research

A psychologist, who developed her research specialism at the University of Lincoln, is working to improve understanding of disorders that affect the way the brain interprets sounds, after being appointed as a Post-Doctoral Research Scientist by the UK’s leading medical research organisation.
Dr Hettie Roebuck, who studied for both an undergraduate degree and a PhD at Lincoln’s School of Psychology, is researching Auditory Processing Disorder (APD) at the Medical Research Council’s Institute for Hearing Research (IHR).
Award-winning animal welfare specialist joins Life Sciences team
Pigs will be studied to assess welfare issues

An animal welfare academic whose award-winning research is helping to improve health in pedigree dogs, has joined the Life Sciences team at the University of Lincoln, UK.
Dr Lisa Collins, new programme leader for Bioveterinary Science, is one of the world’s few animal welfare epidemiologists – applying the study of the patterns, causes and effects of health and disease conditions to animals.
While at The Royal Veterinary College in London, she was principal investigator in a study examining inherited defects in pedigree dogs.
Disaster Response Expert Swells Ranks
Dr Lucy Easthope
Dr Lucy Easthope, an expert in mass fatality disasters, has joined the growing team of scientists at the University of Lincoln, UK.
Lucy has advised governments, corporations and relief agencies in the aftermath of major incidents, including the 2010 and 2011 Christchurch earthquakes in New Zealand, as well as developing contingency plans, training programmes and exercises with a number of international organisations. She has participated in the response to major aviation disasters, the Bali terrorist attacks and the operations at Brize Norton, during the military campaign in Iraq.
Her consultancy and research specialisms focus on mass fatalities planning, Disaster Victim Identification (DVI), community recovery and the care of survivors, the bereaved and the deceased after disaster.
She’s an Engineer! 

BeckyMargettsThe Women’s Engineering Society recently published an article about one of our own women engineers – Becky Margetts – under their new feature She’s an Engineer.

Rebecca says: “WES do some fantastic work supporting women in science and technology, and I’m pleased to be featured.  I feel that real-life experiences could be useful for young women considering a career in engineering, and I hope my story shows some of the places engineering can take you.”

Identifying Afghanistan’s war dead
Gillian Fowler, left, at the conference

Gillian Fowler,  a forensic anthropologist from the School of Life Sciences, has contributed to a special report which outlines steps Afghanistan can take to help identify the victims of the country’s 35-year conflict.  Gillian has been involved with the Afghan Forensic Science Organisation (AFSO) from its inception in 2010.

National recognition for architecture graduates
Angelitia Clarke (right) meets HRH The Duke of GloucesterTalented Lincoln graduates are celebrating after being shortlisted for the prestigious Duke of Gloucester’s Young Achievers Scheme, which recognises exceptional young professionals within the construction industry.Angelitia Clarke, who studied at the University of Lincoln’s School of Architecture, and Dr Feifei Sun, who is a Knowledge Transfer Partnership (KTP) Associate, were selected as two of just seven finalists nationwide within the scheme’s architecture category.

Women powering ahead in engineering
Engineering School

The Head of the School of Engineering at the University of Lincoln has become one of the youngest Fellows of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers.
Dr Jill Stewart, 36, has joined an ever increasing number of high achieving mid-career engineers to take up a Fellowship.
It is another sign that the gender gap is starting to close with a far greater number of highly talented female engineering and science graduates choosing to work in STEM professions.